Aliens/Ufo

𝑽𝒆𝒏𝒖𝒔 𝑴𝒆𝒆𝒕𝒔 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒓 𝑺𝒕𝒂𝒓’ 𝑨𝒏𝒅 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒈𝒍𝒆’ 𝑯𝒂𝒔 𝑳𝒂𝒏𝒅𝒆𝒅: 𝑾𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝑪𝒂𝒏 𝑺𝒆𝒆 𝑰𝒏 𝑻𝒉𝒆 𝑵𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕 𝑺𝒌𝒚 𝑻𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝑾𝒆𝒆𝒌

Each Monday I pick out the northern hemisphere’s celestial highlights (mid-northern latitudes) for the week ahead, but be sure to check my main feed for more in-depth articles on stargazing, astronomy, eclipses and more.

𝑊ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑇𝑜 𝑊𝑎𝑡𝑐ℎ 𝐹𝑜𝑟 𝐼𝑛 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑁𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑆𝑘𝑦 𝑇ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑊𝑒𝑒𝑘: 𝐴𝑢𝑔𝑢𝑠𝑡 30-𝑆𝑒𝑝𝑡𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟 5, 2021𝑇ℎ𝑒 15𝑡ℎ 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑠𝑘𝑦—𝑆𝑝𝑖𝑐𝑎—𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑤𝑒𝑒𝑘 𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑙𝑒𝑠-𝑢𝑝 𝑡𝑜 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑒𝑡 𝑉𝑒𝑛𝑢𝑠. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝐿𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑛 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑑 𝑓𝑜𝑟 “𝑒𝑎𝑟” 𝑜𝑓 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑡, 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑓𝑙𝑒𝑒𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑝𝑝𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑎𝑛𝑐𝑒 𝑖𝑠𝑛’𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑜𝑛𝑙𝑦 𝑐𝑒𝑙𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑖𝑎𝑙 𝑠𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑤𝑜𝑟𝑡ℎ 𝑠𝑒𝑒𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑤𝑒𝑒𝑘.

𝑽𝒆𝒏𝒖𝒔 𝑴𝒆𝒆𝒕𝒔 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒓 𝑺𝒕𝒂𝒓’ 𝑨𝒏𝒅 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒈𝒍𝒆’ 𝑯𝒂𝒔 𝑳𝒂𝒏𝒅𝒆𝒅: 𝑾𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝑪𝒂𝒏 𝑺𝒆𝒆 𝑰𝒏 𝑻𝒉𝒆 𝑵𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕 𝑺𝒌𝒚 𝑻𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝑾𝒆𝒆𝒌 1

𝑉𝑒𝑛𝑢𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑆𝑝𝑖𝑐𝑎 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝐴𝑙𝑏𝑒𝑟𝑡𝑎, 𝐶𝑎𝑛𝑎𝑑𝑎. 𝑇ℎ𝑒𝑦 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑠ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑒 𝑡𝑜𝑔𝑒𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑤𝑒𝑒𝑘. 

𝐺𝐸𝑇𝑇𝑌 

𝐴 𝑤𝑎𝑛𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑐𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑐𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑤𝑖𝑛𝑑 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑤𝑎𝑦 𝑡ℎ𝑟𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑠𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑒-𝑑𝑎𝑤𝑛 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑠𝑘𝑦 𝑤ℎ𝑖𝑙𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑙𝑦 𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑛𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑏𝑒 𝑎 𝑓𝑎𝑏𝑢𝑙𝑜𝑢𝑠 𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑙𝑜𝑜𝑘 ℎ𝑖𝑔ℎ 𝑢𝑝 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝐴𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑙𝑎, 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝐸𝑎𝑔𝑙𝑒, 𝑎𝑠 𝑤𝑒𝑙𝑙 𝑎𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑓𝑎𝑏𝑢𝑙𝑜𝑢𝑠 “𝑆𝑢𝑚𝑚𝑒𝑟 𝑇𝑟𝑖𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑙𝑒” 𝑠ℎ𝑎𝑝𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑑𝑒𝑓𝑖𝑛𝑒𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑜𝑛’𝑠 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑠𝑘𝑦. 𝑊𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑑𝑜𝑤𝑛, 𝑖𝑡’𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑓𝑒𝑐𝑡 𝑤𝑒𝑒𝑘 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑔𝑎𝑧𝑖𝑛𝑔.

𝑀𝑜𝑛𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝐴𝑢𝑔𝑢𝑠𝑡 30, 2021: 𝐿𝑎𝑠𝑡 𝑄𝑢𝑎𝑟𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛𝐴𝑡 07:13 𝑈𝑛𝑖𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑎𝑙 𝑇𝑖𝑚𝑒 𝑡𝑜𝑑𝑎𝑦 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑠𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑒 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑟𝑒𝑎𝑐ℎ 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝐿𝑎𝑠𝑡 𝑄𝑢𝑎𝑟𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑝ℎ𝑎𝑠𝑒. 𝐼𝑡 𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦 𝑚𝑒𝑎𝑛𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑟𝑖𝑠𝑒𝑠 𝑎𝑓𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑚𝑖𝑑𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡, 𝑐𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑎𝑦 𝑓𝑜𝑟 10 𝑠𝑢𝑐𝑐𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑑𝑎𝑟𝑘, 𝑚𝑜𝑜𝑛𝑙𝑒𝑠𝑠 𝑠𝑘𝑖𝑒𝑠.

𝑽𝒆𝒏𝒖𝒔 𝑴𝒆𝒆𝒕𝒔 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒓 𝑺𝒕𝒂𝒓’ 𝑨𝒏𝒅 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒈𝒍𝒆’ 𝑯𝒂𝒔 𝑳𝒂𝒏𝒅𝒆𝒅: 𝑾𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝑪𝒂𝒏 𝑺𝒆𝒆 𝑰𝒏 𝑻𝒉𝒆 𝑵𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕 𝑺𝒌𝒚 𝑻𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝑾𝒆𝒆𝒌 2

𝐹𝑟𝑖𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝑆𝑒𝑝𝑡𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟 3, 2021: 𝐴 𝑐𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑐𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑎𝑛𝑑 ‘𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑡𝑤𝑖𝑛𝑠’ 𝑜𝑓 𝐺𝑒𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑖

𝐺𝑒𝑡 𝑢𝑝 𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑙𝑦 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑚𝑜𝑟𝑛𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑒-𝑑𝑎𝑤𝑛 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑠𝑘𝑦 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢’𝑙𝑙 𝑠𝑒𝑒 𝑎 16% 𝑤𝑎𝑛𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑐𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑐𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑏𝑒𝑙𝑜𝑤 𝐶𝑎𝑠𝑡𝑜𝑟 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑙𝑢𝑥, 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝐺𝑒𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑖. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑐𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑏𝑒 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 3° 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝑃𝑜𝑙𝑙𝑢𝑥.

𝑌𝑜𝑢’𝑙𝑙 𝑎𝑙𝑠𝑜 𝑔𝑒𝑡 𝑎 𝑏𝑒𝑎𝑢𝑡𝑖𝑓𝑢𝑙 𝑣𝑖𝑒𝑤 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 “𝑤𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑒𝑟” 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑠𝑘𝑦, 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑂𝑟𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑣𝑖𝑠𝑖𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑜𝑢𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑡.

 

𝑽𝒆𝒏𝒖𝒔 𝑴𝒆𝒆𝒕𝒔 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒓 𝑺𝒕𝒂𝒓’ 𝑨𝒏𝒅 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒈𝒍𝒆’ 𝑯𝒂𝒔 𝑳𝒂𝒏𝒅𝒆𝒅: 𝑾𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝑪𝒂𝒏 𝑺𝒆𝒆 𝑰𝒏 𝑻𝒉𝒆 𝑵𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕 𝑺𝒌𝒚 𝑻𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝑾𝒆𝒆𝒌 3

 𝑆𝑎𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝑆𝑒𝑝𝑡𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟 4, 2021: 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝐵𝑒𝑒ℎ𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝐶𝑙𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟 

𝑆𝑇𝐸𝐿𝐿𝐴𝑅𝐼𝑈𝑀

𝑆𝑎𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝑆𝑒𝑝𝑡𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟 4, 2021: 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝐵𝑒𝑒ℎ𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝐶𝑙𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟𝐼𝑛 𝑎𝑛𝑜𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑝𝑟𝑒-𝑑𝑎𝑤𝑛 𝑠𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢’𝑙𝑙 𝑏𝑒 𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑠𝑒𝑒 𝑎 𝑠𝑙𝑖𝑚 7%-𝑙𝑖𝑡 𝑐𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑐𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑀𝑜𝑜𝑛 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 3° 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝐵𝑒𝑒ℎ𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝐶𝑙𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟—𝑎𝑏𝑜𝑢𝑡 60 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝑎 𝑝𝑎𝑖𝑟 𝑜𝑓 𝑏𝑖𝑛𝑜𝑐𝑢𝑙𝑎𝑟𝑠, 𝑡ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑎 𝑑𝑜𝑧𝑒𝑛 𝑜𝑟 𝑠𝑜 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑑𝑜𝑢𝑡-𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡.

𝐴𝑛 𝑜𝑝𝑒𝑛 𝑐𝑙𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑜𝑓 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑎𝑏𝑜𝑢𝑡 520 𝑙𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡-𝑦𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑡 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝐶𝑎𝑛𝑐𝑒𝑟, 𝑖𝑡’𝑠 𝑜𝑛𝑒 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑛𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑏𝑒𝑠𝑡-𝑙𝑜𝑜𝑘𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑜𝑝𝑒𝑛 𝑐𝑙𝑢𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑡𝑜 𝑢𝑠.

𝑽𝒆𝒏𝒖𝒔 𝑴𝒆𝒆𝒕𝒔 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒓 𝑺𝒕𝒂𝒓’ 𝑨𝒏𝒅 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒈𝒍𝒆’ 𝑯𝒂𝒔 𝑳𝒂𝒏𝒅𝒆𝒅: 𝑾𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝑪𝒂𝒏 𝑺𝒆𝒆 𝑰𝒏 𝑻𝒉𝒆 𝑵𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕 𝑺𝒌𝒚 𝑻𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝑾𝒆𝒆𝒌 4

𝑆𝑢𝑛𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝑆𝑒𝑝𝑡𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟 5, 2021: 𝑉𝑒𝑛𝑢𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑆𝑝𝑖𝑐𝑎 

𝑆𝑇𝐸𝐿𝐿𝐴𝑅𝐼𝑈𝑀

𝑆𝑢𝑛𝑑𝑎𝑦, 𝑆𝑒𝑝𝑡𝑒𝑚𝑏𝑒𝑟 5, 2021: 𝑉𝑒𝑛𝑢𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑆𝑝𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑇𝑜𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑖𝑚𝑚𝑒𝑑𝑖𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑦 𝑎𝑓𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑠𝑢𝑛𝑠𝑒𝑡 𝑖𝑡 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑏𝑒 𝑝𝑜𝑠𝑠𝑖𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑠𝑒𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑒𝑡 𝑉𝑒𝑛𝑢𝑠 𝑠ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑤 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑛 𝑠𝑘𝑦 𝑎 𝑚𝑒𝑟𝑒 1.4° 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝑆𝑝𝑖𝑐𝑎, 𝑡ℎ𝑒 15𝑡ℎ 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑠𝑘𝑦.

𝑌𝑜𝑢’𝑙𝑙 𝑛𝑒𝑒𝑑 𝑡𝑜 𝑏𝑒 𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑐𝑘—𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑏𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑦 𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑏𝑖𝑛𝑜𝑐𝑢𝑙𝑎𝑟𝑠—𝑡𝑜 𝑠𝑒𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑎𝑖𝑟 𝑏𝑒𝑓𝑜𝑟𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑦 𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑘 𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑒 ℎ𝑜𝑟𝑖𝑧𝑜𝑛. 

𝑆𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑒𝑒𝑘: 𝑆𝑝𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑉𝑖𝑟𝑔𝑜, 𝑆𝑝𝑖𝑐𝑎 𝑖𝑠 𝑎 𝑠𝑢𝑚𝑚𝑒𝑟 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑛𝑜𝑟𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑛 ℎ𝑒𝑚𝑖𝑠𝑝ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒.

𝐴𝑙𝑡ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑙𝑜𝑜𝑘𝑠 𝑙𝑖𝑘𝑒 𝑜𝑛𝑒 𝑝𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑙𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑖𝑡’𝑠 𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑢𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦 𝑎 𝑏𝑖𝑛𝑎𝑟𝑦 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑠𝑦𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑚—𝑎 𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑒 𝑑𝑜𝑢𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟—𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑢𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝑎𝑟𝑜𝑢𝑛𝑑 240 𝑙𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑦𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑓𝑟𝑜𝑚 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑆𝑜𝑙𝑎𝑟 𝑆𝑦𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑚. 

𝑽𝒆𝒏𝒖𝒔 𝑴𝒆𝒆𝒕𝒔 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒓 𝑺𝒕𝒂𝒓’ 𝑨𝒏𝒅 𝑻𝒉𝒆 ‘𝑬𝒂𝒈𝒍𝒆’ 𝑯𝒂𝒔 𝑳𝒂𝒏𝒅𝒆𝒅: 𝑾𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝑪𝒂𝒏 𝑺𝒆𝒆 𝑰𝒏 𝑻𝒉𝒆 𝑵𝒊𝒈𝒉𝒕 𝑺𝒌𝒚 𝑻𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝑾𝒆𝒆𝒌 5

𝐶𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑒𝑒𝑘: 𝐴𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑙𝑎, 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑒𝑎𝑔𝑙𝑒 

𝑆𝑇𝐸𝐿𝐿𝐴𝑅𝐼𝑈𝑀

𝐶𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑤𝑒𝑒𝑘: 𝐴𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑙𝑎, 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝐸𝑎𝑔𝑙𝑒𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝐴𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑙𝑎, 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝐸𝑎𝑔𝑙𝑒, 𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑑𝑑𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑀𝑖𝑙𝑘𝑦 𝑊𝑎𝑦 𝑎𝑛𝑑 ℎ𝑎𝑠 𝐴𝑙𝑡𝑎𝑖𝑟 𝑎𝑠 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟. 𝐽𝑢𝑠𝑡 16 𝑙𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑦𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑡, 𝐴𝑙𝑡𝑎𝑖𝑟 𝑖𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 12𝑡ℎ 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑛𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑠𝑘𝑦. 

𝑉𝑖𝑠𝑖𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑓𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑑𝑎𝑟𝑘, 𝐴𝑙𝑡𝑎𝑖𝑟 𝑓𝑜𝑟𝑚𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑙𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑟 𝑝𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 “𝑆𝑢𝑚𝑚𝑒𝑟 𝑇𝑟𝑖𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑙𝑒”—𝑎𝑛 𝑖𝑛𝑓𝑜𝑟𝑚𝑎𝑙 𝑎𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑠𝑚 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑏𝑟𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑉𝑒𝑔𝑎 𝑖𝑛 𝐿𝑦𝑟𝑎 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝐷𝑒𝑛𝑒𝑏 𝑖𝑛 𝐶𝑦𝑔𝑛𝑢𝑠 𝑎𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑡𝑜𝑝 𝑡𝑤𝑜 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑠. 𝐽𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑏𝑜𝑣𝑒 𝐴𝑙𝑡𝑎𝑖𝑟 𝑖𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑟 𝑇𝑎𝑟𝑎𝑧𝑒𝑑, 𝑤ℎ𝑖𝑐ℎ 𝑖𝑠 460 𝑙𝑖𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑦𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑠 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑛𝑡. 

𝑇𝑖𝑚𝑒𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑑𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑠 𝑔𝑖𝑣𝑒𝑛 𝑎𝑝𝑝𝑙𝑦 𝑡𝑜 𝑚𝑖𝑑-𝑛𝑜𝑟𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑛 𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑡𝑢𝑑𝑒𝑠. 𝐹𝑜𝑟 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑚𝑜𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑐𝑐𝑢𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑒 𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛-𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑐𝑖𝑓𝑖𝑐 𝑖𝑛𝑓𝑜𝑟𝑚𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑢𝑙𝑡 𝑜𝑛𝑙𝑖𝑛𝑒 𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑒𝑡𝑎𝑟𝑖𝑢𝑚𝑠 𝑙𝑖𝑘𝑒 𝑆𝑡𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑎𝑟𝑖𝑢𝑚 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑆𝑘𝑦 𝐿𝑖𝑣𝑒. 𝐶ℎ𝑒𝑐𝑘 𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑒𝑡-𝑟𝑖𝑠𝑒/𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑛𝑒𝑡-𝑠𝑒𝑡, 𝑠𝑢𝑛𝑟𝑖𝑠𝑒/𝑠𝑢𝑛𝑠𝑒𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑚𝑜𝑜𝑛𝑟𝑖𝑠𝑒/𝑚𝑜𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑒𝑡 𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒𝑠 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑎𝑟𝑒.

𝑊𝑖𝑠ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑐𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑟 𝑠𝑘𝑖𝑒𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑤𝑖𝑑𝑒 𝑒𝑦𝑒𝑠. 

Back to top button
Close